Supply Chain Management: Principles and Best Practices You Can Use

The benefits of supply chain management translate to improvements in revenue, cost and assets. Revenue increases the top line. Cost savings improve profits and/or profit margins. More effective inventory management and capital asset utilization reduce assets and thereby improve financial performance. 

My 8-step program of optimization initiatives maximizes your benefits:

It has worked for companies like yours.

Click here for a list of articles, books, and presentations I have written and delivered on supply chain management.

Click here to contact me.

Regards,

David Steven Jacoby

1740 Broadway, 15th Floor

New York, NY 10019

www.davidjacoby.bostonstrategies.com

Twitter: @dsjacoby

USA Mobile: +1 617 593 2620 ; Fax: +1 720 294 5239

If you like, you can book a meeting directly in my calendar by clicking on this link.

More EPC Project Opportunities in China

The list below contains some capital projects you may find interesting. They are all approved and funded by government sources, and each one is seeking minority funding from private overseas investors. If you are interested in bidding on the EPC contracts, or if you know of investors who might find a minority position in any of them an attractive portfolio investment, please let me know or forward this email to the appropriate parties.

The capital expenditure represents the total in the project. 

Active/Upcoming EPC Project Opportunities

Regards,

David Steven Jacoby

President

BOSTON STRATEGIES INTERNATIONAL 

1740 Broadway, 15th Floor

New York, NY 10019

www.davidjacoby.bostonstrategies.com

Twitter: @DavidStevenJ

USA Mobile: +1 617 593 2620 ; Fax: +1 720 294 5239

Legal Case of the Month: Natural Gas Contracts

For 30 years, David Steven Jacoby has advised oil, gas, power, transportation, automotive, retail and legal clients in over 50 countries on procurement, contracting, and supply chains management. A five-time author on supply chain management, he has worked with clients in the United States, Dubai, Sao Paulo, Hong Kong, Paris, and elsewhere. He also taught Operations Management at Boston University’s graduate business school, served as a contributing editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit, and consulted to the World Bank.    

For more information, click here.   

Counsel frequently seeks out Mr. Jacoby to serve as a consultant and expert witness. His legal work typically focuses on these major areas:

  • Contract interpretation, contract administration, and contract dispute
  • Transfer pricing
  • Price manipulation
  • Monopoly pricing and market dominance
  • Procurement processes and best practices
  • Market economics
  • Logistics and transportation, including pipelines and terminals

David S. Jacoby

c/o Boston Strategies International, Inc.

1740 Broadway, 15th Floor

New York, NY 10019

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Policy Paper of the Month: Infrastructure Spending

Job creation and employment implications of trade policy

Infrastructure and transportation investment evaluation

Public Private Partnership economics

Carbon pricing

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions standards

Industrial Air Pollution Standards

Low-Carbon Fuel Standards

Emissions Trading Schemes (ETS)

Power Generation Efficiency

Renewable Energy Tax Credits

Etc.

Please see the recent case study profile below.  

Boston Strategies International conducts scientific research, technical feasibility studies, and commercial due diligence evaluations that help oil, gas, power and natural resource companies profitably transition to clean energy and e-mobility. We work for business unit and functional department heads, as well as finance, procurement and marketing executives who are responsible for making strategic or long-term commercial decisions involving energy technologies.

David Steven Jacoby has consulted to energy, automotive, and other clients in over 50 countries, has taught graduate Operations Management at Boston University, and serves or has served on the Board of Directors and/or committees of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation, New York Energy Week, the University of Pennsylvania (Technology & Innovation Society), APICS (President & Chair, Boston APICS); the Council of Logistics Management (President & Chair, New England Roundtable); the Institute for Supply Management’s (VP, Logistics & Transportation Group), the International Supply Chain Education Alliance (Chief Judge, Ptak Prize Selection Committee), and others. He holds an MBA from the Wharton School, a Masters in International Business from The Joseph H. Lauder Institute of International Studies, and a Bachelor of Science in Finance and Economics from the University of Pennsylvania. 

David Steven Jacoby

President

BSI | Energy Analytics

Simplifying Complex Decisions About Energy Technology

1740 Broadway, 15th Floor

New York, NY 10019

www.bostonstrategies.com

Twitter: @bostonstratint

USA Mobile: +1 617 593 2620 ; Fax: +1 720 294 52

Where is the Trade War Headed?

What is the end game of the escalating trade war between the US and China? David Steven Jacoby’s book “Trump, Trade and the End of Globalization:” 

  • Explains the reasons behind the current trade war
  • Reveals the challenges of globalization
  • Explores alternative trade frameworks using country examples
  • Evaluates alternative models of isolationism, bilateralism and protectionism
  • Provides a roadmap for a new and sustainable global trade order

Available at Bookstores

Supply Chain Management: Principles and Best Practices You Can Use

The 39 methods, techniques and methods of SCM can be used to successfully execute the 4 supply chain management (SCM) strategies: rationalisation, synchronisation, customisation and innovation. Rationalisation is aimed at containing operating costs. Synchronisation is aimed at balancing supply with demand. Customisation aims to enhance the customer interface. And innovation is focused on achieving rapid new product development and introduction.

When managed together, effective SCM offers at least a 30% potential improvement in economic value added (EVA). Rationalisation strategies can contribute 4–6%. Synchronisation strategies can generate 5–7%. Customisation can add up to 6–10%, and innovation benefits can exceed 15%.

BSI’s 8-step program of optimization initiatives can maximize your benefits:

It has worked for companies like yours.

Click here for a list of articles, books, and presentations I have written and delivered on supply chain management.

David Steven Jacoby
Global Supply Chain Management Consultant
https://davidjacoby.bostonstrategies.com
Twitter: @dsjacoby

Economic & Trade Policy Paper of the Month

David Steven Jacoby and the team at Boston Strategies International recently completed a policy study on clean energy value chains, which involved a comparison of the value added and levelized cost of energy for natural gas combined cycle, solar photovoltaic, wind and geothermal technologies. 

Click the image below for a detailed Table of Contents of the report:   

Boston Strategies International conducts scientific researchtechnical feasibility studies, and commercial due diligence evaluations that help oil, gas, power and natural resource companies profitably transition to clean energy and e-mobility. We work for business unit and functional department heads, as well as finance, procurement and marketing executives who are responsible for making strategic or long-term commercial decisions involving energy technologies.

David Steven Jacoby has consulted to energy, automotive, and other clients in over 50 countries, has taught graduate Operations Management at Boston University, and serves or has served on the Board of Directors and/or committees of the North American Electric Reliability CorporationNew York Energy Week, the University of Pennsylvania (Technology & Innovation Society), APICS (President & Chair, Boston APICS); the Council of Logistics Management (President & Chair, New England Roundtable); the Institute for Supply Management’s (VP, Logistics & Transportation Group), the International Supply Chain Education Alliance (Chief Judge, Ptak Prize Selection Committee), and others. He holds an MBA from the Wharton School, a Masters in International Business from The Joseph H. Lauder Institute of International Studies, and a Bachelor of Science in Finance and Economics from the University of Pennsylvania. 

Thanks and Regards,

David Steven Jacoby
Global Supply Chain Management Consultant
https://davidjacoby.bostonstrategies.com
Twitter: @dsjacoby

Expert Witness Case of the Month

For 30 years, David Steven Jacoby has advised oil, gas, power, transportation, automotive, retail and legal clients in over 50 countries on procurement, contracting, and supply chains management. A five-time author on supply chain management, he has worked with clients in the United States, Dubai, Sao Paulo, Hong Kong, Paris, and elsewhere. He also taught Operations Management at Boston University’s graduate business school, served as a contributing editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit, and consulted to the World Bank.    

Counsel frequently seeks out Mr. Jacoby to serve as a consultant and expert witness. His legal work typically focuses on these major areas:

  • Contract interpretation, contract administration, and contract dispute
  • Transfer pricing
  • Price manipulation
  • Monopoly pricing and market dominance
  • Procurement processes and best practices
  • Market economics
  • Logistics and transportation, including pipelines and terminals

For more information, click here.   

Thanks and Regards,

David Steven Jacoby
Global Supply Chain Management Consultant
https://davidjacoby.bostonstrategies.com
Twitter: @dsjacoby

Energy, E-mobility, and Clean Tech Investments Seeking P/E, VC, and Project Finance

Please find below a list of fast-growing companies and projects that I am working with. Many of them are looking for funding. If you are interested in finding out more about any of them, please click here to tell me which of them interest you, and I’ll send you some material on those.

Private Equity and Venture Capital

Project Finance

Please share this post with anybody you feel may be interested in learning more about these investment opportunities.

Thanks and Regards,

David Steven Jacoby
Global Supply Chain Management Consultant
https://davidjacoby.bostonstrategies.com
Twitter: @dsjacoby

Editorial: Setting New Rules for World Trade

The current trade policy of the current U.S. administration is inflating U.S. costs and driving away longstanding trading partners while not changing the fundamental economics of trade or the Chinese government’s protectionist approach to intellectual property. Trade wars increase the cost of production in the US, which disincentivizes American companies like Harley Davidson from manufacturing locally. They put next-generation energy companies like SunPower at risk by increasing the cost of their components. And they drive strategically important trade partners like Germany to form fresh new relationships with Asian partners instead of America. Rather than wage trade wars, the United States should build ‘platform infrastructure’ for knowledge-based high-tech solutions in clean energy, machine learning, intelligent transportation, medical solutions, education, and aerospace.

Wharton Econometrics figures that a trade war will cost world GDP 0.9% by 2027, but if the multilateral trading and commercial institutions such as the EU were to dissolve completely, possibly eventually taking the euro with them, the impact will be far more damaging. An implosion of trade agreements across the globe would cost the US 2.7% of GDP and the world 1.7% of GDP. As the US pulls out of more and more multilateral political institutions such as the Paris Accord, the U.N. Human Rights Council, and possibly NATO, the probability of a US withdrawal from the World Trade Organization (WTO) is rising. A severe isolationism scenario involving a total collapse of the world trading system would cause a 3.8% contraction in global GDP in the medium term, according to analysis presented in my book Trump, Trade, and the End of Globalization.

The United States should take the lead in redefining a new world trade system. Leadership will assure it of a long-term advantage, as it had for several generations after it took the lead in designing a new world financial and trading system after World War II, starting with the trading system that became the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), which was eventually folded into the World Trade Organization (WTO), and the monetary system that was agreed at Bretton Woods.

Instead of fighting over steel, aluminum and soybeans, and tearing down multilateral institutions, the United States could advance a new model centered on countries’ comparative advantages instead of “free trade for all” (traditionally defined as zero tariffs and zero subsidies across the board). A codified set of boundaries could allow, within limits, knowledge-centric companies to protect their intellectual property within their country’s national borders, industrial companies to receive subsidies, and agricultural producers to receive export exemptions, up to capped, reported, and audited levels.

For example, Baidu (China) would be allowed to mandate Chinese intellectual property in its apps within China, and Google would be allowed to erect non-tariff barriers to foreign competitors within the American market, as long as both countries agreed to transparent reporting and auditing, and the WTO quantified and policed the advantage to a maximum of 10% of the value-added. The EU’s subsidies to Airbus could be legitimate, in principle, but capped at 10% of value-added and audited, and the United States could subsidize Boeing to the same extent. Agricultural producers could receive exemption from tariffs from importing countries (up to 10% of value added), as some do today under Generalized Systems of Preferences (GSP). Companies in Thailand, India, and Brazil, for example, receive tariff exemption from wealthier countries (namely the US and the EU), which benefit from the system by accessing cheaper food products than they could produce themselves.

Antagonistic or isolationist approaches trade approaches are already prompting the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), from which the United States withdrew, to move ahead aggressively and fruitfully, without the US. China and the EU are forming new trade alliances together, without the United States.

World War I taught us that isolationism is politically and economically dangerous. In contrast, the leadership taken after World War II, which was defined by the establishment of today’s world trade order, led to over 50 years of growth. Today is different, so let’s adjust, but let’s not go backward.

David Steven Jacoby is the author of Trump Trade, and the End of Globalization (Praeger / ABC-CLIO 2018), The High Cost of Low Prices: A Roadmap to Sustainable Prosperity (Business Expert Press, 2017), and  From Bogota to Beijing: Development and Life After Globalization (Lexington Press, 2018).

The views represented above are the author’s alone and do not represent the opinions or positions of Boston Strategies International.

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